Daily Dharma

 

Published week by week, you will find a quote for each day

of the year from the past and present masters of Buddhism

Sunday

 

If there is a remedy when trouble strikes,
What reason is there for despondency?
And if there is no help for it,
What is the use of being sad?

 

So come what may, I'll never harm
My cheery happiness of mind.
Depression never brings me what I want;
My virtue will be warped and marred by it.

 

Nagarjuna

Monday

 

Thousands of candles can be lit from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared.

 

Shakyamuni Buddha

Tuesday

 

Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.

 

If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice comapssion.

 

His Holiness the Dalai Lama

Wednesday

 

When you have the thought that each being is so precious, then naturally respect comes, then you want to offer service, and if there's anything you can do, even just a small thing you can do, then it makes you so happy, even just a small thing you can offer, it brings incredible joy and happiness, satisfaction and fulfillment, meaning in life.

 

You don't need to obsess over the attainment of future realizations. As long as you act in the present with as much understanding as you possibly can, you'll realize everlasting peace in no time at all.

 

If you neglect to protect your mind, you can neither close the door to suffering nor open the door to happiness.

 

Lama Zopa Rinpoche

Thursday

 

The Buddhist notion of diligence is to delight in positive deeds. Its opposite, called le lo in Tibetan, has three aspects. Le lo is usually translated as "laziness," though only its first aspect refers to laziness as we usually understand it.


The first aspect is not doing something because of indolence, even though we know that it is good and ought to be done.


The second aspect is faintheartedness. This comes about when we underestimate our qualities and abilities, thinking, "I'm so incompetent and weak. It would be good to do that, but I could never accomplish it." Not having the confidence of thinking, "I can do it," we end up doing nothing.


The third aspect refers to being very busy and seeming diligent, but wasting time and energy on meaningless activities that will not accomplish anything in the long run. When we do many things for no real purpose, we fail to focus on what is truly worthwhile and our path has no clear direction.


When we refrain from these three aspects of laziness, we are diligent.

 

Ringu Tulku Rinpoche

Friday

 

Even if we feel certain that we will live for a hundred years, many years of that span have passed already and we haven’t accomplished much. We approach death like a man sleeping in a railway carriage, constantly getting closer and closer to the destination yet unaware of the process. There is little we can do to stop this process. We just constantly come ever-closer to death.

 

No matter how much money, jewelry, houses or clothes we have accumulated during our life, it will make no difference whatsoever at the time of our death. When we die we will have to go empty-handed. Not even the tiniest material object can be taken with us. The body itself must be left behind. The body and the mind separate and the mindstream continues by itself. Not only is it impossible to take a possession with us, we cannot even take our body.
What accompanies the consciousness after death? If we have to leave our body, our friends and all our possessions, is there any helper or anything which accompanies our consciousness to the future life?

 

There is something that follows the consciousness after death: the karmic imprints that we have accumulated during this lifetime.

 

Tsenzhab Serkong Rinpoche

Saturday

 

But what need is there to say much more?
The childish work for their own benefit,
The Buddhas work for the benefit of others.
Just look at the difference between them!

 

Shantideva

To see more quotes, select a different week

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